Making an easy indoor herb garden

All you need is a window that receives sunlight and you can plant in any residential location.
Making an easy indoor herb garden
If you decide to use cuttings, such as thyme and rosemary, start them using a mixture of peat, perlite, and vermiculite.
Foto: Flickr

Having an indoor herb garden means you don’t have to worry about what the weather is like outside, or if it’s not gardening season. There is no need to install a new window in the kitchen, nor is it necessary to perform extensive home renovations to create a garden indoors.

This holds true for apartment and condo living where access to outdoor planting plots is not available. All you need is a window that receives plenty of sunlight at least five hours per day, and you can plant in any type of residential location. You can put together your herb garden by using cuttings or by planting seeds.

If you decide to use cuttings, such as thyme and rosemary, start them using a mixture of peat, perlite, and vermiculite. These mixtures are often sold in bags at greenhouses, through florists, and in the garden section of most big box stores. It is not uncommon to start from seeds though, so don’t worry if you would rather make your indoor herb garden this way.

To begin, gather some clay pots (terra cotta is another popular choice) with good drainage to ensure water and air circulates efficiently. Start by using smaller pots, six inch diameter works best, so the plants remain protected.

Avoid planting different seeds in the same pot; this will stop the herbs from tasting like each other! Indoor herb gardens are easier to have in separate pots. Most indoor herb gardens are planted in traditional potting soil which is easily found wherever planting and gardening supplies are sold.

Follow the directions on the seed packet to determine how deep to plant the seeds in the soil. Once the seeds are covered over, use a misting spray bottle to lightly mist the top of each pot with water. Keep the pots in the sun and make sure the soil stays damp.

Place the pots on a tray or on matching saucers to collect water that drains from the pots. That way, you are not damaging the surfaces beneath the pots if you need to mist them daily. If your house is particularly dry you’ll find you need to mist on a daily basis because the soil will dry quicker than usual.

Once your indoor herb gardens start sprouting, make sure you do not overwater or the roots will begin rotting. The soil should be damp, but not saturated. If you’re using cuttings for your indoor herb gardens, make sure the soil where the plants are sprouting from dries out completely before you water again.