Hispanic population still booming despite zero immigration

Although Latino immigration into the United States has stalled in recent years, the Hispanic population still remains the largest and fastest growing minority group in…
Hispanic population still booming despite zero immigration

U.S. births drive population growth as immigration stalls. (Photo: Flickr/SEIU/Shell Photographics)

Although Latino immigration into the United States has stalled in recent years, the Hispanic population still remains the largest and fastest growing minority group in the country.

There are now more U.S. born Latinos than foreign-born Latinos in the country, revealing a decline in Hispanic immigration since its peak in 2010 of 18.8 million, according to a study by Pew Research Center.

SEE ALSO: Report shows how immigration enforcement has changed over the years

Pew releases a study on hispanic immigration population.

After over four decades of extreme Hispanic immigration growth, the U.S. is experiencing a decline in Mexican immigration due to the struggling national economy and increased dangers of crossing the border.

Currently, as many people from Mexico are exiting the U.S. as are entering, which indicates a stall in Hispanic immigration.

While less Latinos are entering the U.S. than four years ago, the Latino population in the U.S. continues to explode.

In the past 40 years, the Latino population has increased from 9.1 million to 53 million, and is expected to reach over 30% of the U.S. population by 2060.

This surge in Hispanic growth is no longer due to a forecasted uptick of immigration, but rather because the millions of Hispanics that immigrated to the U.S. throughout the past several decades have started to have children.

According to Pew, U.S. born Latinos now account for about 60% of the nation’s Latino population, significantly outnumbering the percentage of foreign-born Latinos.

The states with the largest Hispanic populations are California, Texas, Florida, New York, and Illinois.

Yet none of these states account for the fastest growing Latino populations; instead, Tennessee, South Carolina, Alabama, Kentucky, and South Dakota are home to the fastest growing Hispanic populations.

So even though the Latino immigration into the U.S. is rapidly declining, the overall Latino population continues to grow quickly because of the increase in U.S. born Latinos.

SEE ALSO: Rise in Hispanics in college doesn’t mean more bachelor’s degrees