Fidel Castro’s daughter returns to Cuba for first time in two decades

Alina Fernandez Revuelta, the daughter of former Cuban ruler Fidel Castro, has returned to Cuba for the first time in 21 years to visit her…

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Alina Fernandez Revuelta, the daughter of former Cuban ruler Fidel Castro, has returned to Cuba for the first time in 21 years to visit her seriously ill mother.

Fernandez Revuelta fled to Spain over two decades ago using a fake passport and a wig, escaping the country where her father ruled as the leader of the Communist regime.

SEE ALSO: 6 developments if the Castro regime were to fall 

Fernandez Revuelta was an outspoken critic of both her father’s role as a leader and of Cuba’s Communist regime, and is well known for her 1997 autobiographical book, “Castro’s Daughter: An Exile’s Memoir of Cuba”.

In addition to criticizing the Communist government of Cuba, Fernandez Revuelta has often called her father “cruel” and “unhelpful” in regards to family matters.

According to the “Miami Herald,” Fernandez Revuelta was spotted in Havana this week, just days after her mother, Natalia “Naty” Revuelta, suffered a severe stroke.

Her mother’s unstable health condition was serious enough to bring Fernandez Revuelta back to her home country, which came as a shock to many, especially since she had told Miami’s EFE news agency just six weeks ago that she was not ready to return to Cuba just yet.

Fidel Castro’s estranged daughter in Cuba to visit her ailing mother. (AP Photo/Javier Galeano)

Fernandez Revuelta’s relationship with Fidel Castro had always been strained, as she didn’t learn that Castro was her father until she was 10 years old, when she was informed of her mother’s affair with the Cuban ruler.

While married to Orlando Fernandez, Natalia Revuelta met and had an affair with the young revolutionary Fidel Castro, which led to Fernandez Revuelta’s birth in 1956.

While Fernandez Revuelta distinctly expressed that she does not hate her father, she has stated that she has no desire to see him again.

In the EFE interview, she said, “That’s not a possibility…I believe there is an absolute lack of interest on both sides. I have nothing to say to him.”

So although Fernandez Revuelta is back in Cuba for the first time in 21 years, she’s not expected to sit down with her estranged father, especially when she harbors such criticism for what he has done to her country.

“For Cubans, the legacy of Castro is a country ruined,” she said, “And with part of its people in exile, an experience very hard and difficult to cure.”

SEE ALSO: Fidel Castro’s life of luxury