Texas Gov. Rick Perry turned himself in to be fingerprinted

UPDATE: 8/19/14 – 6P.M. EST Governor Rick Perry turned himself in to be photographed and fingerprinted at the Travis County Courthouse, and by several media…
Texas Gov. Rick Perry turned himself in to be fingerprinted

Governor Rick Perry is expected to turn himself in to authorities in Texas on abuse of power charges. (AP Photo/Austin American-Statesman, Laura Skelding)

UPDATE: 8/19/14 – 6P.M. EST

Governor Rick Perry turned himself in to be photographed and fingerprinted at the Travis County Courthouse, and by several media accounts held his head high and waved to sympathizers who were rallying in support outside the courthouse. Many are calling the attorneys representing him a legal dream team.

Texas Governor Rick Perry is expected to surrender to police Tuesday afternoon in connection to an abuse of power case his attorney’s have called “outrageous.”

SEE ALSO: Gov. Rick Perry sends National Guard troops to Texas border

CBS News is reporting Governor Perry will turn himself in around 5 p.m. central time after being indicted Friday on two felony counts of abuse of power. Many pundits, not just Rick Perry’s legal team have questioned the validity of such indictment, including the “New York Times.”

Prosecutors alleged Perry called on Travis County District Attorney Rosemary Lehmberg to resign after being arrested and pleading guilty to drunk driving in 2013. When she refused to step down, prosecutors say Perry vetoed $7.5 million in funding for her office.

“It is unprecedented, it is outside the bounds. I think that’s why you see so many people who are not Rick Perry supporters, who are Democrats, saying how wrong this indictment is,” Ben Ginsburg told CBS News.

He is a well known attorney who is part of Perry’s legal team and has worked closely with the Republican party before.

Despite the accusations, Perry plans to continue campaigning when he visits key voting states for a possible 2016 presidential bid. A visit to New Hampshire is planned for this weekend, but many are still weary of the gaffes he performed during his 2012 campaign.

“I don’t think (Republicans) will take the indictment so seriously but they want to see if this Rick Perry is able to contend with adversity the way the other Rick Perry was unable to,” said Dante Scala, a political science professor at the University of New Hampshire. “The last time they saw him, he was stumbling around.”

Others who agree with Perry that the indictment is politically motivated and without substance say his record in office will be their focus.

“People are going to want to see what he’s saying about immigration because that’s an issue that’s certainly going to come up in the November elections,” said state senator and former Congressman Jeb Bradley. “They’re also going to want to hear why is the Texas economy one of the best in the nation and what can we learn about it here in New Hampshire.”

SEE ALSO: Texas Democrats weigh in on border crisis

The Associated Press contributed to this report.