Did we really learn anything about female orgasm in 2014?

Let’s be honest, female orgasm has always been–and still seems to be–a mystery to the scientific community. Experts know women can have orgasms, they just can’t seem to pinpoint how they are triggered or why the route to climax is so much more complicated than for men. But that doesn’t mean there haven’t been some interesting discoveries during 2014 that show we are making some process in understanding female sexuality. SEE ALSO: 3 ways the winter can affect your sex life Probably one of the most intriguing (and some think telling) discoveries was that lesbians are leading the way when it comes to female orgasms. According to a study from The Kinsey Institute for Research in Sex, Gender and Reproduction at Indiana University, lesbian women have the highest chance of experiencing an orgasm at 75 percent, while heterosexual women and bisexual women had a 62 percent and 58 percent chance of an orgasm, respectively. “This is consistent with literature suggesting that male orgasm is subject to less inconsistency, seemingly regardless of sexual orientation, perhaps due to both sex-speci?c physiology and culturally reinforced gender roles that endorse male sexual activity and pleasure,” the study authors wrote, as reported by MNT. “These data demonstrate the need for further investigations into the comparative sexual experiences and outcomes of sexual minorities, to understand the mechanisms by which sociodemographics, and, in particular, sexual orientation, affects sexual health outcomes including orgasm experiences.” Reaching orgasm is far more complicated than just which sexual preference group a woman belongs to, however. Factors such as friendships, age and quality of a partner had much to do with who had an orgasm and who didn’t. A study this year from the Journal of Comparative Psychology suggests women who surround themselves with male friends tend to have more orgasms because their significant other feels he needs to compete with the other men in the picture. Researchers referred to this as “sperm competition,” and indicate it’s an evolutionary trait where male significant others will work harder in the bedroom to prevent their female from wanting to stray. The findings go hand-in-hand with other research that found women had more orgasms when the quality of their mate was higher, meaning women with men who were well educated, confident and funny had more orgasms compared to other women. To add to all the complexities of female orgasm, experts found age was also a factor; women who started having sex at an earlier age generally had more orgasms, as did women who were in their mid-twenties. To clench all the research, another telling study, this time from Monash University (Melbourne), found that women who lose sexual desire are very concerned about the issue, dispelling the common myth that women couldn’t care less about having sex. SEE ALSO: Enrique Iglesias encourages you to have safe sex But with all this research, it still appears that experts are no closer to understanding female orgasm. Despite the discoveries of 2014, female orgasm remains a very personal, complex process, influenced by emotions, age, friends, family, and environmental factors. Ultimately, there is one truth that remains when it comes to women and pleasure: knowing yourself is the best way to achieve an orgasm in any given sexual scenario. “Ultimately,” said sex coach Elle Chase to The Daily Beast, “you are the expert on your own body. If you haven’t explored your body and discovered how you like to be pleased, then you’re putting all your orgasm’s eggs in somebody else’s proverbial basket.”The post Did we really learn anything about female orgasm in 2014? appeared first on Voxxi.

Have we learned anything about the female orgasm in 2014? (Shutterstock)

Let’s be honest, female orgasm has always been–and still seems to be–a mystery to the scientific community. Experts know women can have orgasms, they just can’t seem to pinpoint how they are triggered or why the route to climax is so much more complicated than for men.

But that doesn’t mean there haven’t been some interesting discoveries during 2014 that show we are making some process in understanding female sexuality.

SEE ALSO: 3 ways the winter can affect your sex life

Probably one of the most intriguing (and some think telling) discoveries was that lesbians are leading the way when it comes to female orgasms.

According to a study from The Kinsey Institute for Research in Sex, Gender and Reproduction at Indiana University, lesbian women have the highest chance of experiencing an orgasm at 75 percent, while heterosexual women and bisexual women had a 62 percent and 58 percent chance of an orgasm, respectively.

“This is consistent with literature suggesting that male orgasm is subject to less inconsistency, seemingly regardless of sexual orientation, perhaps due to both sex-speci?c physiology and culturally reinforced gender roles that endorse male sexual activity and pleasure,” the study authors wrote, as reported by MNT. “These data demonstrate the need for further investigations into the comparative sexual experiences and outcomes of sexual minorities, to understand the mechanisms by which sociodemographics, and, in particular, sexual orientation, affects sexual health outcomes including orgasm experiences.”

Reaching orgasm is far more complicated than just which sexual preference group a woman belongs to, however. Factors such as friendships, age and quality of a partner had much to do with who had an orgasm and who didn’t.

A study this year from the Journal of Comparative Psychology suggests women who surround themselves with male friends tend to have more orgasms because their significant other feels he needs to compete with the other men in the picture. Researchers referred to this as “sperm competition,” and indicate it’s an evolutionary trait where male significant others will work harder in the bedroom to prevent their female from wanting to stray.

The findings go hand-in-hand with other research that found women had more orgasms when the quality of their mate was higher, meaning women with men who were well educated, confident and funny had more orgasms compared to other women.

To add to all the complexities of female orgasm, experts found age was also a factor; women who started having sex at an earlier age generally had more orgasms, as did women who were in their mid-twenties.

Women have sexual dysfunction too
Many things impact female orgasm, such as age and quality of partner. (Shutterstock)

To clench all the research, another telling study, this time from Monash University (Melbourne), found that women who lose sexual desire are very concerned about the issue, dispelling the common myth that women couldn’t care less about having sex.

SEE ALSO: Enrique Iglesias encourages you to have safe sex

But with all this research, it still appears that experts are no closer to understanding female orgasm. Despite the discoveries of 2014, female orgasm remains a very personal, complex process, influenced by emotions, age, friends, family, and environmental factors. Ultimately, there is one truth that remains when it comes to women and pleasure: knowing yourself is the best way to achieve an orgasm in any given sexual scenario.

“Ultimately,” said sex coach Elle Chase to The Daily Beast, “you are the expert on your own body. If you haven’t explored your body and discovered how you like to be pleased, then you’re putting all your orgasm’s eggs in somebody else’s proverbial basket.”

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