Hispanics top list for obesity, binge drinking and inactivity

America’s health statistics are in, according to this year’s United Health Foundation report, and while Hawaii was the healthiest state and Mississippi was the least healthiest state, rate of obesity, smoking, drinking, and poverty varied significantly across the nation. One number was consistent throughout the findings, however. According to the report, Hispanics in the United States had the lowest percentage of people with “high health status,” regardless of which state they resided in. Out of all ethnicities in the country, Hispanics had the highest rates of binge drinking, low physical activity and obesity. SEE ALSO: Is ‘love’ the missing health link in the Hispanic paradox? “Obesity, physical inactivity and nutrition are, according to the CDC, battles that can be won,” Russ Bennet, a spokesman for UHF, told Fox News Latino via email. “By providing the Hispanic community with the information they need to properly navigate the healthcare system and increasing their knowledge about their health and the effects of lifestyle choices, the Hispanic community can work towards closing the gap with other ethnicities.” Hispanics traditionally have lower rates of seeking medical care compared to non-Hispanic whites, something attributed to cultural beliefs, socioeconomic status, language barriers, transportation barriers, and physician mistrust, among other things. These barriers prevent Hispanics from seeking the care they need in a timely fashion and negates many of the benefits seen within the population linked to a longer lifespan. Hispanics live an average of 3 years longer than non-Hispanic whites, according to the National Center for Health Statistics, despite having many high risk symptoms for chronic diseases like diabetes. This phenomenon is referred to as the Hispanic paradox. The longevity benefit could even be better, however, if Hispanics received medical attention at the same rate as other ethnicities. “Consider that Hispanics in general are traditionally lower users of medical services compared to the rest of the population, [so] it is possible that their access to these medications is much lower than other ethnic groups,” explained Bennet. “It’s important to note that last year cancer took over as the number one killer among Latinos over cardiovascular disease, so it is something that we should keep a watchful eye on.” SEE ALSO: Why culturally relevant care is key to improving Latino health Improving Hispanic health is an achievable goal, state experts, because many of the primary issues affecting Hispanics–like obesity and low physical activity levels–can be managed without major medical intervention. The trick is overcoming all the barriers that prevent Hispanics from seeking care. Awareness campaigns are beneficial in spreading the word about relevant diseases, but Hispanics also need culturally relevant care so they feel comfortable visiting the doctor in the first place.The post Hispanics top list for obesity, binge drinking and inactivity appeared first on Voxxi.

Hispanics in the U.S. report the lowest “high health rate” numbers. (Shutterstock)

America’s health statistics are in, according to this year’s United Health Foundation report, and while Hawaii was the healthiest state and Mississippi was the least healthiest state, rate of obesity, smoking, drinking, and poverty varied significantly across the nation.

One number was consistent throughout the findings, however. According to the report, Hispanics in the United States had the lowest percentage of people with “high health status,” regardless of which state they resided in. Out of all ethnicities in the country, Hispanics had the highest rates of binge drinking, low physical activity and obesity.

SEE ALSO: Is ‘love’ the missing health link in the Hispanic paradox?

“Obesity, physical inactivity and nutrition are, according to the CDC, battles that can be won,” Russ Bennet, a spokesman for UHF, told Fox News Latino via email. “By providing the Hispanic community with the information they need to properly navigate the healthcare system and increasing their knowledge about their health and the effects of lifestyle choices, the Hispanic community can work towards closing the gap with other ethnicities.”

Hispanics traditionally have lower rates of seeking medical care compared to non-Hispanic whites, something attributed to cultural beliefs, socioeconomic status, language barriers, transportation barriers, and physician mistrust, among other things.

These barriers prevent Hispanics from seeking the care they need in a timely fashion and negates many of the benefits seen within the population linked to a longer lifespan.

Hispanics live an average of 3 years longer than non-Hispanic whites, according to the National Center for Health Statistics, despite having many high risk symptoms for chronic diseases like diabetes. This phenomenon is referred to as the Hispanic paradox. The longevity benefit could even be better, however, if Hispanics received medical attention at the same rate as other ethnicities.

“Consider that Hispanics in general are traditionally lower users of medical services compared to the rest of the population, [so] it is possible that their access to these medications is much lower than other ethnic groups,” explained Bennet. “It’s important to note that last year cancer took over as the number one killer among Latinos over cardiovascular disease, so it is something that we should keep a watchful eye on.”

SEE ALSO: Why culturally relevant care is key to improving Latino health

Improving Hispanic health is an achievable goal, state experts, because many of the primary issues affecting Hispanics–like obesity and low physical activity levels–can be managed without major medical intervention. The trick is overcoming all the barriers that prevent Hispanics from seeking care. Awareness campaigns are beneficial in spreading the word about relevant diseases, but Hispanics also need culturally relevant care so they feel comfortable visiting the doctor in the first place.

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The post Hispanics top list for obesity, binge drinking and inactivity appeared first on Voxxi.