Measles cases linked to Disney parks in California

Nine measles cases have been traced back to Disney theme parks in California, said state health officials this week. Seven people from California and two from Utah have confirmed cases of the illness, and three more California residents are under measles watch. SEE ALSO: Could the measles virus have cured a woman’s cancer? All patients with confirmed or suspected cases of the illness visited Disneyland or Disney California Adventure between Dec. 15 and Dec. 20, according to a statement from the California Department of Public Health. “If you have symptoms, and believe you may have been exposed, please contact your health care provider,” stated Dr. Ron Chapman, Department of Health Director. “The best way to prevent measles and its spread is to get vaccinated.” Disney has stated no employees have been confirmed with cases of the measles, so exactly how 9 people became ill remains a mystery. Unfortunately, according to Dr. Jonathan L. Temte, chairman of the U.S. Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices, it is very likely that many more people were exposed. Though the measles vaccine is considered to be 99 percent effective, fewer and fewer people are becoming immunized. Current vaccination rates for the United States are around 90-95 percent; however, when looking at a large group such as those in an amusement park, that means more cases of measles might pop up. If you turn around and do the math, of the people at Disneyland at the time that this occurred, probably 90 to 95 percent were vaccinated,” Temte told Yahoo Health. “All of a sudden you realize that is a much higher attack rate.” Since the year 2000, measles has been considered “eliminated” from the United States; however, the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) indicate in 2014 there were a record number of cases. Some 610 cases were reported among 20 outbreaks, with the majority of infected individuals unvaccinated. SEE ALSO: Are you a super-spreader? The California Department of Health explains Disney theme parks in the state are popular destinations for international travelers, and large measles outbreaks have occurred in Western Europe, Pakistan, Vietnam and the Philippines in recent years. “Travelers to areas where measles is endemic can bring measles back to the U.S., resulting in limited domestic transmission of measles,” read the statement. “Disney and other theme parks in California are international attractions and visitors come from many parts of the world, including those where measles is endemic.” Measles presents itself as fever, cough, runny nose and red eyes and within a few days a red rash appears, usually first on the face and then spreads downward to the rest of the body. Individuals who think they may have measles should immediately seek medical care as the illness is highly contagious and can be airborne.The post Measles cases linked to Disney parks in California appeared first on Voxxi.

Disney theme parks in California have been linked to 9 measles cases. (flickr.com/tombricker/)

Nine measles cases have been traced back to Disney theme parks in California, said state health officials this week. Seven people from California and two from Utah have confirmed cases of the illness, and three more California residents are under measles watch.

SEE ALSO: Could the measles virus have cured a woman’s cancer?

All patients with confirmed or suspected cases of the illness visited Disneyland or Disney California Adventure between Dec. 15 and Dec. 20, according to a statement from the California Department of Public Health.

“If you have symptoms, and believe you may have been exposed, please contact your health care provider,” stated Dr. Ron Chapman, Department of Health Director. “The best way to prevent measles and its spread is to get vaccinated

Disney has stated no employees have been confirmed with cases of the measles, so exactly how 9 people became ill remains a mystery. Unfortunately, according to Dr. Jonathan L. Temte, chairman of the U.S. Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices, it is very likely that many more people were exposed. Though the measles vaccine is considered to be 99 percent effective, fewer and fewer people are becoming immunized. Current vaccination rates for the United States are around 90-95 percent; however, when looking at a large group such as those in an amusement park, that means more cases of measles might pop up.

If you turn around and do the math, of the people at Disneyland at the time that this occurred, probably 90 to 95 percent were vaccinated,” Temte told Yahoo Health. “All of a sudden you realize that is a much higher attack rate.”

Since the year 2000, measles has been considered “eliminated” from the United States; however, the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) indicate in 2014 there were a record number of cases. Some 610 cases were reported among 20 outbreaks, with the majority of infected individuals unvaccinated.

If you have a rash seek medical care
A body rash is a symptom of the measles. (Shutterstock)

SEE ALSO: Are you a super-spreader?

The California Department of Health explains Disney theme parks in the state are popular destinations for international travelers, and large measles outbreaks have occurred in Western Europe, Pakistan, Vietnam and the Philippines in recent years. “Travelers to areas where measles is endemic can bring measles back to the U.S., resulting in limited domestic transmission of measles,” read the statement. “Disney and other theme parks in California are international attractions and visitors come from many parts of the world, including those where measles is endemic.”

Measles presents itself as fever, cough, runny nose and red eyes and within a few days a red rash appears, usually first on the face and then spreads downward to the rest of the body. Individuals who think they may have measles should immediately seek medical care as the illness is highly contagious and can be airborne.

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The post Measles cases linked to Disney parks in California appeared first on Voxxi.