Less religious diversity on Capitol Hill than in America

The lawmakers on Capitol Hill may not see eye-to-eye on political issues, but there is one common denominator amongst the majority of the 114th Congress—religion. According to a new study by the Pew Research Center, approximately nine in ten members of the House and Senate identify as Christians. This makes Congress significantly more Christian than the national population. SEE ALSO: How Latinos are changing religion in America In America, 73 percent of adults consider themselves Christians. The Democrats in Congress are more religiously diverse than Republicans, although they still lean more Christian than the general population. According to Pew, 81.6 percent of Democrats in Congress identify as Christians compared to 99.7 percent of Republicans. Only one Republican in Congress is not a Christian. Rep. Lee Zeldin of New York’s 1st District is Jewish. Of the 535 members of the 114th Congress that was sworn in on Tuesday, 491 identify as Christians, while 9 responded with “don’t know” or declined to answer the question. Congress is not only more Christian than the American population, but it is also more Jewish. The study found that 5 percent of Congress is Jewish, compared to 2 percent of the general population. Buddhists, Muslims, and Hindus combined represented one percent of Congress, while they represent roughly 2 percent of American adults. Unlike the American public, Congress is unwavering in its religious beliefs. Only one Congress member—Rep. Kyrsten Sinema from Arizona—claims to be unaffiliated. That’s just .02 percent of Congress that doesn’t subscribe to a particular religion, while 20 percent of the American population is unaffiliated. SEE ALSO: Religious and spiritual practices of 20 Latino celebrities In areas other than religion, the 114th Congress is the most diverse group ever, with 104 women and 96 racial minorities in the group. Although this is the most diverse Congress to date, it still falls short of being representative of the American public. While it seems that politics are gradually becoming more diversified in terms of race and gender, it doesn’t seem like religious diversity will be seen from the lawmakers on Capitol Hill in the near future.The post Less religious diversity on Capitol Hill than in America appeared first on Voxxi.

Congress is still less religiously diverse than the American public. (Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images)

The lawmakers on Capitol Hill may not see eye-to-eye on political issues, but there is one common denominator amongst the majority of the 114th Congress—religion.

According to a new study by the Pew Research Center, approximately nine in ten members of the House and Senate identify as Christians. This makes Congress significantly more Christian than the national population.

SEE ALSO: How Latinos are changing religion in America

In America, 73 percent of adults consider themselves Christians.

The Democrats in Congress are more religiously diverse than Republicans, although they still lean more Christian than the general population. According to Pew, 81.6 percent of Democrats in Congress identify as Christians compared to 99.7 percent of Republicans.

Only one Republican in Congress is not a Christian. Rep. Lee Zeldin of New York’s 1st District is Jewish.

Of the 535 members of the 114th Congress that was sworn in on Tuesday, 491 identify as Christians, while 9 responded with “don’t know” or declined to answer the question.

The Religious makeup of the 114th Congress. (Credit: PEW)
The Religious makeup of the 114th Congress. (Credit: PEW)

Congress is not only more Christian than the American population, but it is also more Jewish.

The study found that 5 percent of Congress is Jewish, compared to 2 percent of the general population.

Buddhists, Muslims, and Hindus combined represented one percent of Congress, while they represent roughly 2 percent of American adults.

Unlike the American public, Congress is unwavering in its religious beliefs. Only one Congress member—Rep. Kyrsten Sinema from Arizona—claims to be unaffiliated. That’s just .02 percent of Congress that doesn’t subscribe to a particular religion, while 20 percent of the American population is unaffiliated.

SEE ALSO: Religious and spiritual practices of 20 Latino celebrities

In areas other than religion, the 114th Congress is the most diverse group ever, with 104 women and 96 racial minorities in the group. Although this is the most diverse Congress to date, it still falls short of being representative of the American public.

While it seems that politics are gradually becoming more diversified in terms of race and gender, it doesn’t seem like religious diversity will be seen from the lawmakers on Capitol Hill in the near future.

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The post Less religious diversity on Capitol Hill than in America appeared first on Voxxi.