Hispanic paradox confirmed among lupus sufferers

Hispanics and other ethincities are disproportionately affected by lupus, a chronic, autoimmune disease known for attacking the body’s healthy tissues. The Lupus Foundation of America indicates women of color are 2-3 times more likely than non-Hispanic white women to develop lupus, but despite this statistic, new research suggests Hispanic patients don’t necessarily have worse outcomes. SEE ALSO: Altering gut bacteria could help people with lupus According to new research published in Arthritis & Rheumatology, Hispanic and Asian patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) have lower mortality rates compared to non-Hispanic black, non-Hispanic white, or Native Americans with the disease. SLE accounts for 70 percent of lupus cases in the United States. According to the Lupus Foundation of America, in nearly half of all SLE cases, a major organ, such as the heart, lungs, kidneys or brain, will be affected. SLE causes the body to create autoantibodies, meaning immune cells that mistakenly target healthy tissue rather than foreign pathogens. This results in a state of chronic inflammation that cause severe pain as well as damage to internal organs. It is estimated 10 to 15 percent of individuals with lupus die prematurely due to complications of the disease, like organ failure. “While previous research has examined racial differences among lupus patients, the studies have primarily been based at academic research centers,” lead author Dr. Jose A. Gomez-Puerta said in a press release. “Our study investigates the variation in death rates due to lupus among different ethnic groups in a general clinical setting.” Gomez-Puerta and his team found, out of more than 40,000 lupus sufferers, the annual mortality rate for those with lupus was highest in Native Americans, followed by non-Hispanic blacks and non-Hispanic whites. Hispanic and Asian lupus patients had lower mortality rates than non-Hispanic black, non-Hispanic white, or Native American patients even after adjusting for demographic and clinical factors. “In less than three years of follow-up of Medicaid patients with lupus we found a great disparity in mortality rates among ethnic groups,” Gomez-Puerta said in conclusion. “Understanding the variation of death among the races is important to determine how best to treat individual patients, modify risk factors, and ultimately improve survival for those with lupus.” SEE ALSO: More natural treatment may offer lupus relief While the research confirmed Hispanics have a lower mortality rate despite having a higher rate of lupus diagnosis, the study did not investigate why such a disparity occurred. For many, it is just another testament to the Hispanic paradox, a phrase used to describe how Hispanics, despite having higher disease risk factors or diagnosis rates, maintain a better longevity compared to other racial and ethnic groups. Though no one has been able to define the exact mechanisms behind the Hispanic paradox, most believe it is a complex mixture of genetics, cultural behaviors and environmental influences.The post Hispanic paradox confirmed among lupus sufferers appeared first on Voxxi.

Hispanic lupus patients have lower mortality rates compared to most other ethnicities. (Shutterstock)

Hispanics and other ethincities are disproportionately affected by lupus, a chronic, autoimmune disease known for attacking the body’s healthy tissues.

The Lupus Foundation of America indicates women of color are 2-3 times more likely than non-Hispanic white women to develop lupus, but despite this statistic, new research suggests Hispanic patients don’t necessarily have worse outcomes.

SEE ALSO: Altering gut bacteria could help people with lupus

According to new research published in Arthritis & Rheumatology, Hispanic and Asian patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) have lower mortality rates compared to non-Hispanic black, non-Hispanic white, or Native Americans with the disease.

SLE accounts for 70 percent of lupus cases in the United States. According to the Lupus Foundation of America, in nearly half of all SLE cases, a major organ, such as the heart, lungs, kidneys or brain, will be affected. SLE causes the body to create autoantibodies, meaning immune cells that mistakenly target healthy tissue rather than foreign pathogens. This results in a state of chronic inflammation that cause severe pain as well as damage to internal organs.

It is estimated 10 to 15 percent of individuals with lupus die prematurely due to complications of the disease, like organ failure.

“While previous research has examined racial differences among lupus patients, the studies have primarily been based at academic research centers,” lead author Dr. Jose A. Gomez-Puerta said in a press release. “Our study investigates the variation in death rates due to lupus among different ethnic groups in a general clinical setting.”

Gomez-Puerta and his team found, out of more than 40,000 lupus sufferers, the annual mortality rate for those with lupus was highest in Native Americans, followed by non-Hispanic blacks and non-Hispanic whites. Hispanic and Asian lupus patients had lower mortality rates than non-Hispanic black, non-Hispanic white, or Native American patients even after adjusting for demographic and clinical factors.

FAmily meal time is important
No one know exactly what is behind the Hispanic paradox, but culture, genetics and environment all may play a role. (Shutterstock)

“In less than three years of follow-up of Medicaid patients with lupus we found a great disparity in mortality rates among ethnic groups,” Gomez-Puerta said in conclusion. “Understanding the variation of death among the races is important to determine how best to treat individual patients, modify risk factors, and ultimately improve survival for those with lupus.”

SEE ALSO: More natural treatment may offer lupus relief

While the research confirmed Hispanics have a lower mortality rate despite having a higher rate of lupus diagnosis, the study did not investigate why such a disparity occurred. For many, it is just another testament to the Hispanic paradox, a phrase used to describe how Hispanics, despite having higher disease risk factors or diagnosis rates, maintain a better longevity compared to other racial and ethnic groups.

Though no one has been able to define the exact mechanisms behind the Hispanic paradox, most believe it is a complex mixture of genetics, cultural behaviors and environmental influences.

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The post Hispanic paradox confirmed among lupus sufferers appeared first on Voxxi.