‘Spare Parts’ film proves there are great roles for Latino actors, just not enough

The Academy Award nominations have been announced, and there is one glaring consistency—the overwhelming lack of diversity amongst the nominees. Out of the 20 actors nominated in the four acting categories, every single one is white. David Oyelowo, the African American lead actor in “Selma,” was expected to receive a nomination, but he was snubbed in favor of five white actors, including Steve Carell for “Foxcatcher” and Michael Keaton for “Birdman.” There were also no Asian American, Native American, or Hispanic actors nominated. This begs the question: Where are the roles for minorities in film? SEE ALSO: ‘Spare Parts’ is a stepping stone in Carlos PenaVega’s career In 2013, Latinos accounted for 32 percent of the nation’s moviegoers, so it seems incongruous that there are so few roles for Latino actors in film and television. The highly anticipated film “Spare Parts” might just be the breath of fresh air that is needed to shake up the homogeneity of Hollywood. The film recounts the true story of four undocumented Mexican high school students who, against all odds, win a national robotics competition in an uplifting underdog story. “Spare Parts” features performances by George Lopez, Marisa Tomei, Jamie Lee Curtis, and Carlos Pena Vega. Lopez, the comedian who sparked surprise for tackling a serious role in the film, believes that this underdog story is simply one that needs to be told. “This is a movie that will stand the test of time,” he said. “And it will always be something that you’ll be able to show other people. And when someone says that you can’t, you can say ‘si se puede.’” “Spare Parts” was inspired by a story written by journalist Joshua Davis for Wired Magazine. Davis reported on the motivational true story, and before long the story made its way to Hollywood. The film premiered in Tempe, Arizona last Tuesday, and members of the Hispanic community have already praised it for bringing an important story about immigrants into the public eye. Jose Antonio Tijerino, President and CEO of the Hispanic Heritage Foundation (HHF), said in a press release, “’Spare Parts’ captures not just a compelling underdog story, but moreover the great potential that is often hiding in every corner of America.” SEE ALSO: Another great year for Mexican directors at the Oscars Lily Eskelsen Garcia, NEA President, said, “To see on the big screen people – four undocumented Latino students and their teacher – who don’t usually get the hero treatment is refreshing.” While audiences are responding positively to this inspirational story featuring Latino lead actors, others have been quick to point out that Latinos are still vastly underrepresented in pop culture. Gina Rodriguez, the breakout star of the CW sitcom “Jane the Virgin,” pointed out this flaw in Hollywood during her acceptance speech at the Golden Globes last Sunday. “This award is so much more than myself,” Rodriguez said. “It represents a culture that wants to see themselves as heroes.”The post ‘Spare Parts’ film proves there are great roles for Latino actors, just not enough appeared first on Voxxi.

Carlos PenaVega, Oscar Vasquez, and George Lopez attend the ‘Spare Parts’ screening at Landmark E Street Cinema on January 13, 2015 in Washington, DC. (Photo by Teresa Kroeger/Getty Images)

The Academy Award nominations have been announced, and there is one glaring consistency—the overwhelming lack of diversity amongst the nominees.

Out of the 20 actors nominated in the four acting categories, every single one is white. David Oyelowo, the African American lead actor in “Selma,” was expected to receive a nomination, but he was snubbed in favor of five white actors, including Steve Carell for “Foxcatcher” and Michael Keaton for “Birdman.”

There were also no Asian American, Native American, or Hispanic actors nominated. This begs the question: Where are the roles for minorities in film?

SEE ALSO: ‘Spare Parts’ is a stepping stone in Carlos PenaVega’s career

In 2013, Latinos accounted for 32 percent of the nation’s moviegoers, so it seems incongruous that there are so few roles for Latino actors in film and television.

The highly anticipated film “Spare Parts” might just be the breath of fresh air that is needed to shake up the homogeneity of Hollywood. The film recounts the true story of four undocumented Mexican high school students who, against all odds, win a national robotics competition in an uplifting underdog story.

“Spare Parts” features performances by George Lopez, Marisa Tomei, Jamie Lee Curtis, and Carlos Pena Vega.

The cast of Spare Parts is posing.
Cast attend the Los Angeles Premiere of Pantelion Films’ “Spare Parts” at Arclight Cinemas on Thursday, January 8, 2015, in Los Angeles. (Photo by Todd Williamson/Invision for Pantelion FIlms/AP Images)

Lopez, the comedian who sparked surprise for tackling a serious role in the film, believes that this underdog story is simply one that needs to be told.

“This is a movie that will stand the test of time,” he said. “And it will always be something that you’ll be able to show other people. And when someone says that you can’t, you can say ‘si se puede.’”

“Spare Parts” was inspired by a story written by journalist Joshua Davis for Wired Magazine. Davis reported on the motivational true story, and before long the story made its way to Hollywood.

The film premiered in Tempe, Arizona last Tuesday, and members of the Hispanic community have already praised it for bringing an important story about immigrants into the public eye.

Jose Antonio Tijerino, President and CEO of the Hispanic Heritage Foundation (HHF), said in a press release, “’Spare Parts’ captures not just a compelling underdog story, but moreover the great potential that is often hiding in every corner of America.”

SEE ALSO: Another great year for Mexican directors at the Oscars

Lily Eskelsen Garcia, NEA President, said, “To see on the big screen people – four undocumented Latino students and their teacher – who don’t usually get the hero treatment is refreshing.”

While audiences are responding positively to this inspirational story featuring Latino lead actors, others have been quick to point out that Latinos are still vastly underrepresented in pop culture.

Gina Rodriguez, the breakout star of the CW sitcom “Jane the Virgin,” pointed out this flaw in Hollywood during her acceptance speech at the Golden Globes last Sunday.

“This award is so much more than myself,” Rodriguez said. “It represents a culture that wants to see themselves as heroes.”

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The post ‘Spare Parts’ film proves there are great roles for Latino actors, just not enough appeared first on Voxxi.