Google searches reveal telling numbers of sexless marriages

Marriages lacking in sex are more common than you might think. Until recently, taboo subjects have remained as such. But Google searches reveal facts and details that people are afraid to bring up with their friends, family or spouses, including the indication that sexless marriages are very common. Google searches show us that 21,090 people per month google the phrase “sexless marriage,” and nearly 3,000 more search for “sex starve marriage” and “no sex marriage.” For comparison, the other top marriage related searchers were 6,029 people searching for “unhappy marriage,” and 2,650 searched for “loveless marriage.” This indicates the top complaint about a marriage is not having sex. Google searches about spouses being unwilling to have sex are 16 times more common than searches about spouses being unwilling to talk. SEE ALSO: What is the psychology behind rebound sex? More data reveals what insecurities people grapple with on a daily basis. Men Google more questions about their sexual organ than any other body part: more than about their lungs, liver, feet, ears, nose, throat and brain combined. Men make more searches asking how to make their penises bigger than how to tune a guitar, make an omelet or change a tire. When big is too big It turns out women don’t really care about penis size, according to Google searches. For every search women make about a partner’s privates, men make roughly 170 searches about their own. On the rare occasions women express concerns about a partner’s penis, it’s frequently about its size, but not necessarily that it’s small. More than 40 percent of complaints about a partner’s penis size is that it’s too big. “Pain” is the most Googled word used in searches with the phrase “___ during sex.” Another major sexual concern for men is climaxing prematurely. Men’s second-most-common sex question is how to make their sexual encounters longer. Once again, the insecurities of men do not appear to match the concerns of women. There are roughly the same number of searches asking how to make a boyfriend climax more quickly as climax more slowly. In fact, the most common concern women have related to a boyfriend’s orgasm isn’t about when it happened but why it isn’t happening at all. Google searches suggest one predominant reason: enormous anxiety, with much of it misplaced. The data may be comforting in a strange way. Until now, only perfect qualities and character was presented to the world. SEE ALSO: Enrique Iglesias encourages you to have safe sex But Google searches allow us to see that everyone has insecurities and confusion, no matter who they are. Google also gives us legitimate reasons to worry less than we do. Many of our deepest fears about how our sexual partners perceive us are unjustified. We spend so much time worrying about our own bodies, we have little time left to focus on the bodies of others. These numbers come from an article for the New York Times written by Seth Stephens-Davidowitz who crunches data from Google searches and offers a number of findings — some surprising, others not — about life in the bedroom.The post Google searches reveal telling numbers of sexless marriages appeared first on Voxxi.

A wife is disgruntled at the way their marriage is going. (Shutterstock)

Marriages lacking in sex are more common than you might think.

Until recently, taboo subjects have remained as such. But Google searches reveal facts and details that people are afraid to bring up with their friends, family or spouses, including the indication that sexless marriages are very common.

Google searches show us that 21,090 people per month google the phrase “sexless marriage,” and nearly 3,000 more search for “sex starve marriage” and “no sex marriage.” For comparison, the other top marriage related searchers were 6,029 people searching for “unhappy marriage,” and 2,650 searched for “loveless marriage.” This indicates the top complaint about a marriage is not having sex. Google searches about spouses being unwilling to have sex are 16 times more common than searches about spouses being unwilling to talk.

SEE ALSO: What is the psychology behind rebound sex?

More data reveals what insecurities people grapple with on a daily basis. Men Google more questions about their sexual organ than any other body part: more than about their lungs, liver, feet, ears, nose, throat and brain combined.

Men make more searches asking how to make their penises bigger than how to tune a guitar, make an omelet or change a tire.

When big is too big

Sexless relationships are less common than marriages.
Research shows the boyfriend is more likely the one that does not want sex. (Shutterstock)

It turns out women don’t really care about penis size, according to Google searches. For every search women make about a partner’s privates, men make roughly 170 searches about their own. On the rare occasions women express concerns about a partner’s penis, it’s frequently about its size, but not necessarily that it’s small. More than 40 percent of complaints about a partner’s penis size is that it’s too big.

“Pain” is the most Googled word used in searches with the phrase “___ during sex.”

Another major sexual concern for men is climaxing prematurely. Men’s second-most-common sex question is how to make their sexual encounters longer. Once again, the insecurities of men do not appear to match the concerns of women.

There are roughly the same number of searches asking how to make a boyfriend climax more quickly as climax more slowly. In fact, the most common concern women have related to a boyfriend’s orgasm isn’t about when it happened but why it isn’t happening at all.

Google searches suggest one predominant reason: enormous anxiety, with much of it misplaced. The data may be comforting in a strange way. Until now, only perfect qualities and character was presented to the world.

SEE ALSO: Enrique Iglesias encourages you to have safe sex

But Google searches allow us to see that everyone has insecurities and confusion, no matter who they are. Google also gives us legitimate reasons to worry less than we do. Many of our deepest fears about how our sexual partners perceive us are unjustified. We spend so much time worrying about our own bodies, we have little time left to focus on the bodies of others.

These numbers come from an article for the New York Times written by Seth Stephens-Davidowitz who crunches data from Google searches and offers a number of findings — some surprising, others not — about life in the bedroom.

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The post Google searches reveal telling numbers of sexless marriages appeared first on Voxxi.