Where parents were born affects Hispanic low-income children

There are policies and programs in place that attempt to improve the lives of Hispanic children living in poverty. But a new study says a key to realizing those efforts is understanding the nature of the households in which low-income Hispanic children live. The study released Wednesday by the National Research Center on Hispanic Children and Families looks at the household composition of low-income Hispanic children. It finds that there are major differences between low-income Hispanic children living with at least one foreign-born parent and those living with least one U.S.-born parent. SEE ALSO: Hispanic children by the numbers One major difference is the family structure. The study shows that low-income Hispanic children with foreign-born parents are more likely to grow up with married parents and to live with their biological fathers than are low-income Hispanic children with U.S.-born parents. “This finding translates into a notable advantage for those with at least one foreign-born parent, given the benefits of stable, two-parent families, such as relative economic well-being and parents spending more time with children,” the authors of the study say. But when it comes to the living conditions, the study finds that low-income Hispanic children with foreign-born parents may be at a disadvantage. That’s because these children are almost twice as likely to live in crowded housing than are low-income Hispanic children with U.S.-born parents. This means they live in households with three or more people per bedroom. “Crowded housing is associated with a host of adverse outcomes for children, such as sleep deprivation, behavioral problems, and less-responsive parenting,” the authors of the study say. “Moreover, concerned policymakers and service providers may regard these conditions as a signal of greater residential instability or economic insecurity.” However, the authors also point out that living in crowded conditions isn’t always a bad thing. In some cases, it could be beneficial. For example, more adults in the home could mean more contribution of resources, such as child care. SEE ALSO: Low-income families struggle with basic foods prices When it comes to parental employment, low-income Hispanic children with foreign-born parents have an advantage, as the vast majority of them live in household with an employed adult. Meanwhile,  about two-thirds of low-income Hispanic children with U.S.-born parents live in households with an employed adult. The authors say that the presence of an employed adult may provide stabilizing benefit—like providing regularity in schedules and routines, as well as a role model for the children and others in the home. But it can also have negative effects. The authors of the study say that “if the employment is associated with long or irregular work hours, it may also minimize opportunities for wage earners’ interaction with children or disrupt family schedules.” In addition, the study also analyzes how the households of all low-income Hispanic children compare with those of low-income non-Hispanic white and black children. Here are some of the major findings: An estimated 61 percent of low-income black children live in a single-parent household, more than any other group. About 48 percent of low-income Hispanic children with at least one foreign-born parent live in the same household as their biological father. That contrasts sharply with the percentage of low-income white and black children, as well as Hispanic children living with a U.S.-born parent. Low-income Hispanic children, regardless of where their parents were born, are much more likely to live in crowded households than do low-income white and black children. A higher percentage of low-income Hispanic children with at least one foreign-born parent live in households with an employed adult and with an adult who works full time than any other low-income group. SEE ALSO: Could these health issues be causing American poverty?The post Where parents were born affects Hispanic low-income children appeared first on Voxxi.

A new study finds that the household composition of low-income Hispanic children with foreign-born parents differ from that of low-income Hispanic children with U.S.-born parents. (Shutterstock photo)

There are policies and programs in place that attempt to improve the lives of Hispanic children living in poverty. But a new study says a key to realizing those efforts is understanding the nature of the households in which low-income Hispanic children live.

The study released Wednesday by the National Research Center on Hispanic Children and Families looks at the household composition of low-income Hispanic children. It finds that there are major differences between low-income Hispanic children living with at least one foreign-born parent and those living with least one U.S.-born parent.

SEE ALSO: Hispanic children by the numbers

One major difference is the family structure. The study shows that low-income Hispanic children with foreign-born parents are more likely to grow up with married parents and to live with their biological fathers than are low-income Hispanic children with U.S.-born parents.

“This finding translates into a notable advantage for those with at least one foreign-born parent, given the benefits of stable, two-parent families, such as relative economic well-being and parents spending more time with children,” the authors of the study say.

But when it comes to the living conditions, the study finds that low-income Hispanic children with foreign-born parents may be at a disadvantage. That’s because these children are almost twice as likely to live in crowded housing than are low-income Hispanic children with U.S.-born parents. This means they live in households with three or more people per bedroom.

“Crowded housing is associated with a host of adverse outcomes for children, such as sleep deprivation, behavioral problems, and less-responsive parenting,” the authors of the study say. “Moreover, concerned policymakers and service providers may regard these conditions as a signal of greater residential instability or economic insecurity.”

However, the authors also point out that living in crowded conditions isn’t always a bad thing. In some cases, it could be beneficial. For example, more adults in the home could mean more contribution of resources, such as child care.

SEE ALSO: Low-income families struggle with basic foods prices

When it comes to parental employment, low-income Hispanic children with foreign-born parents have an advantage, as the vast majority of them live in household with an employed adult. Meanwhile,  about two-thirds of low-income Hispanic children with U.S.-born parents live in households with an employed adult.

The authors say that the presence of an employed adult may provide stabilizing benefit—like providing regularity in schedules and routines, as well as a role model for the children and others in the home. But it can also have negative effects. The authors of the study say that “if the employment is associated with long or irregular work hours, it may also minimize opportunities for wage earners’ interaction with children or disrupt family schedules.”

In addition, the study also analyzes how the households of all low-income Hispanic children compare with those of low-income non-Hispanic white and black children. Here are some of the major findings:

  • An estimated 61 percent of low-income black children live in a single-parent household, more than any other group.
  • About 48 percent of low-income Hispanic children with at least one foreign-born parent live in the same household as their biological father. That contrasts sharply with the percentage of low-income white and black children, as well as Hispanic children living with a U.S.-born parent.
  • Low-income Hispanic children, regardless of where their parents were born, are much more likely to live in crowded households than do low-income white and black children.
  • A higher percentage of low-income Hispanic children with at least one foreign-born parent live in households with an employed adult and with an adult who works full time than any other low-income group.

SEE ALSO: Could these health issues be causing American poverty?

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The post Where parents were born affects Hispanic low-income children appeared first on Voxxi.