George Lopez performs at LaughFest, talks growing up Latino

The world of comedy hasn’t always been known for its excess of Latino comedians on TV. “I Love Lucy” featured Desi Arnaz but he was…

George Lopez at the induction ceremony for Star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame for George Lopez, Hollywood Boulevard, Los Angeles, CA. (Shutterstock)

The world of comedy hasn’t always been known for its excess of Latino comedians on TV. “I Love Lucy” featured Desi Arnaz but he was only a side note to Lucille Ball, who got the majority of laughs and top billing.

It wasn’t until 2002 when George Lopez’s show debuted that millions of American households caught a glimpse of Latino-flavored humor. Lopez was cast as manager of a manufacturing plant and head of a large family. If you didn’t know that, you might have missed out on a big milestone for the Hispanic community in the U.S.

SEE ALSO: Conan’s visit to Cuba was more than just comedy

Lopez performed in Grand Rapids on Sunday for the closing day of Gilda’s LaughFest. The 10-day festival was one filled with constant laughter and you’d be hard pressed to find someone who wasn’t smiling from ear to ear.

This was the laugh festival’s fifth running and Lopez ended with a routine dedicated to family life and changing times. The 70-minute routine veered away from swears or offensive words but that doesn’t mean the topics were kid friendly.

Lopez performed in Grand Rapids on Sunday for the closing day of Gilda's LaughFest.

George Lopez hosts the Annenberg Alchemy Peer To Peer Celebration of non-profits at Club Nokia on October 25, 2011 in Los Angeles, California. (Charley Gallay/WireImage)

“Are we still afraid of Ebola? Or just Bill Cosby,” he asked, continuing on with an imitation of the comedian, who had performed at the festival in the past. Cosby’s recent rape allegations are no secret and Lopez did not veer away from the sensitive topic.

“Now the voice makes sense,” Lopez added.

There was plenty of applause for Lopez’s Hispanic related jokes so it’s safe to say a good portion of the audience was Hispanic-Americans, who Lopez made sure to welcome.

“Gracias. To everyone else, I’m not ‘The Dog Whisperer,’” he said, referring to Cesar Millan, the dog trainer and star of his own TV show.

Lopez poked fun at what it’s like to grow up as a Latino, as well as current stereotypes about Mexican Americans, according to M Live.

“Latinos aren’t terrorists. But if they set out to be the next Timothy McVeigh, “We’d be the most effective terrorists. There is no one who’s going to stop a Latino from buying fertilizer. They’ll try to sell you more,” he said.

Lopez performed in Grand Rapids on Sunday for the closing day of Gilda's LaughFest.

George Lopez arrives at the Ultimate Slam Paddle Jam 2010 at Music Box Theater on September 26, 2010 in Los Angeles, CA

He also mentioned that Latinos wouldn’t blow up a federal building, referring to the McVeigh incident in Oklahoma.

“That’s where the checks come from,” Lopez said. “If we’re going to blow up things, we’re going to blow up places we don’t go. Like Bed, Bath and Beyond.”

SEE ALSO: Erik Rivera is the new Latino in stand-up comedy

Not all of the jokes were meant for Hispanic Americans. Much of the humor was universal, such as the differences between parenting styles nowadays versus when he was a kid.

“We let the baby, baby-proof the house. We let them find the danger,” he said. “‘Don’t touch it again.’ That’s how you learn. If we talked back, they’d reach out and choke us,” he said. “If they did it right, you’d never talk back again.”