Editorial: Many Questions Remain About Clinton

Despite all this, the greatest danger to Clinton’s candidacy comes from her using a personal server to handle official emails while she was Secretary of State

SPANISH VERSION
The primary to elect the Democratic Party’s presidential candidate is receiving less attention than the Republican one in the absence of a surprise comparable to Donald Trump’s popularity. Still, this may change soon, judging from the difficulties candidate Hillary Clinton is facing ‒ some of them self-inflicted ‒ that threaten her presidential aspirations.

In the 2008 presidential election, Clinton’s coronation as the Democratic candidate was frustrated by Barack Obama’s surge, backed by progressive Democrats who saw her as too conservative. Today’s landscape looks similar to that election.

Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders, a self-declared socialist, currently appears to represent the anti-Clinton vote and seems to be uniting progressives. Sander’s ability to attract large crowds gets him much air time in the media, boosts him up in the polls and leaves Rhode Island ex-Governor Lincoln Chafee, Maryland ex-Governor Martin O’Malley, and Virginia ex-Senator Jim Webb far behind. They are also lagging badly behind Clinton in terms of funding and organization.

Despite all this, the greatest danger to Clinton’s candidacy comes from her using a personal server to handle official emails while she was Secretary of State. The way she conducted herself is unacceptable. Even worse, tens of thousands of messages were erased under her tenure, another wrong action even though it may be legal.

The emails issue opens the door for Republicans to investigate her in Congress, and to have the Department of Justice follow up with an inquiry to find out if Clinton was trying to hide any wrongdoing by deleting the messages. This situation may potentially harm her candidacy because it jeopardizes her credibility, which is her weak spot even among Democrats.

Hillary Clinton has proposed meaningful ideas regarding education and the economy, but the questions about her email communications are competing for attention and do not seem to be going away. Democrats have reasons to worry, as ‒ for better or for worse ‒ there is still a long way to go before the presidential election.