New Survey Reveals Many Living with Symptoms of Diabetic Nerve Pain Are Undiagnosed Despite Severe and Constant Pain

Cedric “The Entertainer” discusses diagnosis and awareness
disparities among diverse population groups

NEW YORK & ALEXANDRIA, Va.–(BUSINESS WIRE)–Pfizer Inc. (NYSE:PFE) in collaboration with the American Diabetes
Association today announced results of a joint multicultural survey, Community
Health Perspectives,
which found significant gaps in awareness,
diagnosis and management of a serious diabetes-related complication
known as painful diabetic peripheral neuropathy or diabetic nerve pain.
The findings were particularly pronounced among African American and
Hispanic American communities that experience symptoms of diabetic nerve
pain, including burning, shooting pain in the feet or hands. Community
Health Perspectives
was conducted to support Step On Up™, an
educational program about diabetic nerve pain that encourages people to
speak with a health care provider.

“I got involved with Step On Up because I saw firsthand how the
pain impacted my father, who has type 2 diabetes and diabetic nerve
pain. Results from this survey show he’s not alone, especially in the
African American community,” said Cedric “The Entertainer,”
award-winning actor and comedian. “Nearly half of African Americans
surveyed had not talked to a health care provider about their nerve pain
in the feet and/or hands. I want to encourage people experiencing
symptoms of diabetic nerve pain to take action and speak with a doctor
about their pain.”

Community Health Perspectives surveyed a main sample of 1,000
adults (“general respondents”) in the United States who had been
diagnosed with diabetes and experienced symptoms of diabetic nerve pain
in their feet and/or hands. Among the general respondents, 76 percent
reported feeling nerve pain in the feet or hands most or all of the time.

The main sample included African American and Hispanic American
respondents. An additional sample of African American (n=452) and
Hispanic American (n=467) adults were then surveyed for further
analysis. The results below represent the combined African American and
Hispanic American samples, which found:

  • On average, African American and Hispanic American respondents showed
    that more than 50 percent were not diagnosed with the condition.
  • More than half of African Americans surveyed said that nerve pain in
    their feet and/or hands impacts their day-to-day life more than any
    other symptom of their diabetes.
  • Hispanic American and African American respondents (74 percent and 80
    percent, respectively) were also less likely than Non-Hispanic Whites
    (97 percent) to agree that nerve pain is a common complication of
    diabetes.
  • Of those African American and Hispanic American respondents who had
    discussed their nerve pain symptoms with their health care provider
    and were diagnosed with diabetic nerve pain, the majority wished they
    had spoken up sooner (80 percent and 85 percent, respectively).

“Diabetes-related complications are common and debilitating, and seven
out of ten general respondents diagnosed with diabetic nerve pain said
that their nerve pain makes them feel like they are not successfully
managing their diabetes,” said Jane Chiang, MD, Senior Vice President
for Medical Affairs and Community Affairs of the American Diabetes
Association. “Community Health Perspectives confirms the need for
ongoing education to motivate more people living with diabetes and
symptoms of diabetic nerve pain to visit their doctor and seek some pain
relief.”

About Diabetic Nerve Pain

More than 29 million people in the United States have diabetes. Nearly
half of people with diabetes have some form of nerve damage, but many
don’t know it. For one out of five people with diabetes, nerve damage
can cause burning, shooting, pins-and-needles pain – a condition known
as painful diabetic peripheral neuropathy, or diabetic nerve pain, which
most often occurs in the feet or hands. For more information, visit http://www.steponup.com.

About Community Health Perspectives

Community Health Perspectives was developed and sponsored by
Pfizer Inc. in collaboration with the American Diabetes Association. The
survey was conducted by Kelton from August 14 – October 8, 2015. The
main sample surveyed included 1,000 adults (“general respondents”) in
the United States 18+ who had been diagnosed with diabetes and
experienced symptoms of diabetic nerve pain in their feet and/or hands.
General respondents comprised: Non-Hispanic Whites (n=823), African
Americans (n=73), Hispanic Americans (n=70) and Other (n=34). Additional
African American (n=452) and Hispanic American (n=467) adults were then
surveyed for further analysis, reaching a total survey sample size of
1,919 respondents. The survey used a mixed-mode design, which included
both online and phone interviews offered in English and Spanish, to
ensure sufficient representation from African American and Hispanic
American respondents in the main and additional analysis. This resulted
in some observed statistical differences dependent on the mode used. A
sample of 308 health care providers was also surveyed. To view or
download the Community Health Perspectives infographic, click here.
The full results of the survey are available upon request.

About the American Diabetes Association

The American Diabetes Association is leading the fight to Stop Diabetes
and its deadly consequences and fighting for those affected by diabetes.
The Association funds research to prevent, cure and manage diabetes;
delivers services to hundreds of communities; provides objective and
credible information; and gives voice to those denied their rights
because of diabetes. Founded in 1940, our mission is to prevent and cure
diabetes and to improve the lives of all people affected by diabetes.

For more information please call the American Diabetes Association at
1-800-DIABETES (800-342-2383) or visit http://www.diabetes.org.
Information from both these sources is available in English and Spanish.

About Pfizer Inc.

At Pfizer, we apply science and our global resources to bring therapies
to people that extend and significantly improve their lives. We strive
to set the standard for quality, safety and value in the discovery,
development and manufacture of health care products. Our global
portfolio includes medicines and vaccines as well as many of the world’s
best-known consumer health care products. Every day, Pfizer colleagues
work across developed and emerging markets to advance wellness,
prevention, treatments and cures that challenge the most feared diseases
of our time. Consistent with our responsibility as one of the world’s
premier innovative biopharmaceutical companies, we collaborate with
health care providers, governments and local communities to support and
expand access to reliable, affordable health care around the world. For
more than 150 years, Pfizer has worked to make a difference for all who
rely on us. For more information, please visit us at www.pfizer.com.
In addition, to learn more, follow us on Twitter at @Pfizer
and @Pfizer_News,
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Contacts

Media:
Pfizer Inc.
Steve Danehy, 212-733-1538
Steven.Danehy@pfizer.com
or
The
American Diabetes Association
Michelle Kirkwood, 703-299-2053
MKirkwood@diabetes.org