New drug may prevent brain damage in people who binge drink

Binge drinking is the most common form of alcohol abuse in the United States, even among people who aren’t chronic drinkers. What’s more, people who binge drink may not realize their day-after hangovers could be symptoms of more serious side-effects like brain damage. SEE ALSO: Will powdered alcohol be on store shelves soon? Now, a breakthrough new drug may help reduce the brain-damaging effects of alcohol indulgence, though not everyone believes this to be a good idea. Drinking, like smoking, is considered bad for your health and a choice; the development of a drug to make one aspect of binge drinking safer could be seen as a way of encouraging people to keep poor health habits. Researchers from the study, told Medical News Today that: “… if you accept that alcohol abuse is going to continue, then it might be sensible for society to try and treat it in some way.” Regardless of the future implications of the drug, the research shows how a new compound called ethane-beta-sultam reduced the brain-damaging effects of binge drinking in rats. Brain damage from binge drinking, according to the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA), is the result of inflammation in the brain, and getting medications to the brain while the body is under the influence of alcohol can be difficult. The research team indicated during a binge-drinking session, the number of glial cells – believed to play a role in blood-brain barrier development – increases in an attempt to protect the brain from alcohol. Ethane-beta-sultam prevents the glial cells from increasing and then penetrates into the brain to control inflammation. The findings could be of particular importance to college students. The younger an individual is, the more the brain is susceptible to the negative effects of alcohol. SEE ALSO: Women twice as likely to die from alcoholism According to the NIAAA, 4 out of 5 college students drink alcohol and approximately half of those do so through binge drinking. The Association defines binge drinking as ” a pattern of drinking that brings blood alcohol concentration (BAC) levels to 0.08 g/dL. This typically occurs after 4 drinks for women and 5 drinks for men—in about 2 hours.” The Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA), which conducts the annual National Survey on Drug Use and Health (NSDUH), defines binge drinking as drinking 5 or more alcoholic drinks on the same occasion on at least 1 day in the past 30 days.The post New drug may prevent brain damage in people who binge drink appeared first on Voxxi.

Could a drug prevent the damage of binge drinking? (Photo by Matt Cardy/Getty Images)

Binge drinking is the most common form of alcohol abuse in the United States, even among people who aren’t chronic drinkers. What’s more, people who binge drink may not realize their day-after hangovers could be symptoms of more serious side-effects like brain damage.

SEE ALSO: Will powdered alcohol be on store shelves soon?

Now, a breakthrough new drug may help reduce the brain-damaging effects of alcohol indulgence, though not everyone believes this to be a good idea. Drinking, like smoking, is considered bad for your health and a choice; the development of a drug to make one aspect of binge drinking safer could be seen as a way of encouraging people to keep poor health habits.

Researchers from the study, told Medical News Today that: “… if you accept that alcohol abuse is going to continue, then it might be sensible for society to try and treat it in some way.”

Regardless of the future implications of the drug, the research shows how a new compound called ethane-beta-sultam reduced the brain-damaging effects of binge drinking in rats. Brain damage from binge drinking, according to the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA), is the result of inflammation in the brain, and getting medications to the brain while the body is under the influence of alcohol can be difficult.

The research team indicated during a binge-drinking session, the number of glial cells – believed to play a role in blood-brain barrier development – increases in an attempt to protect the brain from alcohol. Ethane-beta-sultam prevents the glial cells from increasing and then penetrates into the brain to control inflammation.

The findings could be of particular importance to college students. The younger an individual is, the more the brain is susceptible to the negative effects of alcohol.

SEE ALSO: Women twice as likely to die from alcoholism

According to the NIAAA, 4 out of 5 college students drink alcohol and approximately half of those do so through binge drinking. The Association defines binge drinking as ” a pattern of drinking that brings blood alcohol concentration (BAC) levels to 0.08 g/dL. This typically occurs after 4 drinks for women and 5 drinks for men—in about 2 hours.”

The Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA), which conducts the annual National Survey on Drug Use and Health (NSDUH), defines binge drinking as drinking 5 or more alcoholic drinks on the same occasion on at least 1 day in the past 30 days.

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The post New drug may prevent brain damage in people who binge drink appeared first on Voxxi.