Eva Longoria brings back creepy Mexican myth ‘La Llorona’

It seems as if Mexican-American Hollywood starlet Eva Longoria is in the Halloween spirit with her new project to bring not one, but three spooky…

La llorona, mexican scary ghost floating on a street at night, seasonal Halloween “dia de los muertos” photo composite. (Photo: Shutterstock)

It seems as if Mexican-American Hollywood starlet Eva Longoria is in the Halloween spirit with her new project to bring not one, but three spooky Mexican myths and legends to the small screen.

Described as a supernatural thriller in a realistic tone, Longoria with the help of some friends, will tell stories of the rich Hispanic folklore and myth in a forthcoming TV series.

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“Deadline” reports that NBC has put in development an anthology series from co-executive producer Andrea Newman–of “Chicago Fire” fame–Longoria’s UnbelieEVAble Entertainment and Universal TV.

Eva Longoria is a producer.

Eva Longoria attends the ‘Foxcatcher’ premiere during the 67th Annual Cannes Film Festival on May 19, 2014 in Cannes, France. The Mexican-American will co-produce an anthology series based on Hispanic myth and legends. (Photo: Shutterstock)

Each season of the Hispanic-inspired anthology will explore a different legend and be set in the present-day Southwest.

As the spooky project unfolds, the first season is ready to go and it’s based on “La Llorona” (The Weeping Woman), a widespread legend in Mexico and the American West.

Based on the creepy tale, the story is about a troubled detective investigating a mother accused of trying to drown her child in a small town hiding a supernatural secret.

Newman will write the script and will executive produce with Longoria, as well as UnbeliEVAble’s Ben Spector, according to Deadline.

The legend of “La Llorona”

The legend of “La Llorona” is very popular in Latin American cultures.

It tells the tragic story of a woman named Maria, who drowns her children in order to be with the love of her life. However, that man was not in love with her and as a result, a devastated Maria drowned herself in a river in Mexico City.

Asked in the gates of heaven about the whereabouts of her children, Maria is not allowed to enter the afterlife until she finds them.

She is then formed to wander earth for all eternity, searching in vain for her drowned offspring. She is said to cry “¡Ay, mis hijos!” (“Oh, my children!”).

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This popular myth is often used by Latino parents as a lesson to prevent their children from wandering out at night.

But enough with the eerie reading, let’s break the tension with a classic and funny skit of El Chapulin Colorado featuring “La Llorona.”