More similarities between presidential candidates in Colombia

Aside from the disagreements on the ongoing negotiations between government officials and FARC militia commanders, Colombia’s two presidential candidates don’t differ much in their views…
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More similarities between presidential candidates in Colombia

Aside from the disagreements on the ongoing negotiations between government officials and FARC militia commanders, Colombia’s two presidential candidates don’t differ much in their views for their country’s economic policies and foreign affairs.

Their economic policies and foreign affairs proposals for the future are very similar. Both advocate business-friendly policies, seek to enlarge Colombia’s diplomatic role in South America, and promise to make responsible fiscal decisions that will prolong Colombia’s current pattern of growth. In terms of social policy—including LGBT rights—there are some differences, but the fundamental variation between the incumbent and his challenger continues to revolve around the FARC and the role it should be permitted to play in the Colombian electoral system.

SEE ALSO: Uribe’s influence in the 2014 Colombian elections

Taking their past policy decisions as cabinet members and current platform proposals into account, here’s what Colombia would look like under a re-elected President Juan Manuel Santos or a newly-elected Oscar Ivan Zuluaga:

Colombia under Juan Manuel Santos

Colombia’s actual President Juan Manuel Santos speaks during an anniversary event commemorating the Battle of Boyaca. Santos advocates for continuing negotiations with FARC commanders as part of his election platform. (AP Photo/Fernando Vergara)

1. Potential for peace through a successful resolution of FARC negotiations

Members of the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia, or FARC, Jesus Santrich, left, chief negotiator Ivan Marquez, center, and Ricardo Tellez, right, arrive for the continuation of peace talk

Ivan Marquez (center) is the FARC’s chief negotiator. Here he is seen arriving in Cuba for talks with the Colombian government earlier in 2014. Many in Colombia disagree with the strategy of negotiating with rebel leaders.(AP Photo/Franklin Reyes)

2. Continued economic growth, especially if a peace deal is reached

A worker inspects an oven at a coal mine in Colombia to make coke.

A worker inspects an oven at La Flauta coking coal mine in Tausa, Colombia, Tuesday, Sept. 24, 2013. La Flauta is a small-scale mine that extracts coal to bake into coke, an essential ingredient in the iron and steel industry. (AP Photo/Fernando Vergara)

3. Increased foreign investment

Leaders in the US discuss trade with Colombia.

File-Monday, March 25, 2013- Governor Deval Patrick discusses the Commonwealth’s growing Innovation Economy partnerships at the Associated Industries of Massachusetts’ (AIM) roundtable: “Doing Business in Colombia.” (Deval Patrick/Flickr)

4. Healthy ties with the U.S. and an increased diplomatic role in South America

The Colombian Embassy in the United States sits in the Dupont Circle neighborhood of Washington D.C.

The Thomas T. Gaff House at 1520 20th Street, NW in the Dupont Circle neighborhood of Washington, D.C. serves as the Colombian embassy in the United States. (NCinDC/Flickr)

Colombia under Oscar Ivan Zuluaga

Ivan Zuluaga has had to deal with a resignation in his campaign staff

The presidential candidate for the Democratic Center Party, Oscar Ivan Zuluaga, speaks during a press conference in Bogota, Colombia, Monday, May 19, 2014. Zuluaga is running against incumbent Juan Manuel Santos, in the presidential runoff election.(AP Photo/Javier Galeano)

1. Continued conflict with the FARC militia

Raid on FARC Camp in Ibague Colombia.

Bags containing the bodies of alleged rebels, and seized weapons, were shown to the press at military base in Ibague, Colombia, Wednesday, Jan. 22, 2014. (AP Photo/Fernando Vergara)

2. Continued economic growth through a balanced fiscal agenda

Osca Ivan Zuluaga was finance minister under Alvaro Uribe's presidency.

FILE – In this May 10, 2014 file photo, Democratic Center presidential candidate Oscar Ivan Zuluaga, left, talks to former President Alvaro Uribe, right, and former vice-president Francisco Santos. Zuluaga was finance minister under Uribe’s presidency, and has a strong economic background. (AP Photo/Fernando Vergara)

3. Increased foreign investment

Cartagena Colombia is an industrial city with this major port in Colombia.

Cartagena or Cartagena de Indias, (Cartagena of the Indies), is a large port and industrial city on the northern coast of Colombia. The city is a major economic hub for the country. (Shutterstock)

4. Healthy ties with the U.S. and an increased diplomatic role in South America

Map of the Americas, includes Brazil Colombia and Argentina.

Trade within the Americas is growing. (Shutterstock)

5. Improved educational system

Colombian school children read excerpts of Gabriel Garcia Marquez stories.

A student reads aloud the book One Hundred Years of Solitude written by the late Colombian Nobel Literature laureate Gabriel Garcia Marquez at a school in Bogota, Colombia. Education has also notably improved in the country, and might continue doing so under Oscar Ivan Zuluaga. (AP Photo/Fernando Vergara)

SEE ALSO: Santos, Zuluaga to face off in runoff elections